Evan Meaney: Ceibas: Epilogue: The Well of Representation.

Evan Meaney                                                                                                         Ceibas: Epilogue: The Well of Representation.

September 23 to October 11, 2014

Evan Meaney is an American-born scientist who teaches time-based media design at the University of Tennessee. His practices explore liminalities and glitches of all kinds; equating failing data to ghosts, seances and archival hauntology. He has been an Iowa Arts Fellow, an artist in residence at the Experimental Television Center, and a founding member of GLI.TC/H. Currently, Evan works with the super computing team at Oak Ridge National Laboratories on new projects made possible through generous funding from the National Science Foundation.

His video, Ceibas: Epilogue: The Well of Representation, is in part a remake of Hollis Frampton’s 1979 film Gloria!. Frampton’s film is a silent-film re-enactments of “Finnegan’s Wake” that bookend her 1979 short Gloria! The ballad’s story plays out in broad, puppet-like gestures: dancing, weeping, fighting, limb-flailing. Meaney repurposed hacked, 16-bit video game technology; The Well of Representation asks us to reconsider our fear of the liminal.

Following the convergent narratives of several voices, ranging from the linearly historical to the cybernetically personal, we come to understand the journey ahead: searching from interface to interface, knowing that whatever home we find will be a collaborative compromise, one where we might live beyond our representations and finally come to say what we mean.

This exhibition is supported by grants from the Regional Arts Commission and the Missouri Arts Council with additional assistance from the Center for the Humanities at UM-St. Louis.

 

Gallery 210 is on the University of Missouri – St. Louis at 44 East Drive, TCC between the North UM-St. Louis Metro Station and Touhill Performing Arts Center.  The gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday from 11AM to 5PM.  The gallery phone is (314) 516-5976; the fax is (314) 516-4997; and email is gallery@umsl.edu.  For parking locations, directions, and campus map, please visit gallery210.umsl.edu.

 

Handicapped parking is available near Galley 210

Image Citation

Stiil from Evan Meaney                                                                                                         Ceibas: Epilogue: The Well of Representation 2011                                           00: 7:33”

Snapshots and Polaroids by Andy Warhol

September 20 to December 6, 2014

Gallery 210, University of Missouri St. Louis

Gallery 210 at the University of Missouri-St. Louis opens the exhibition present Snapshots and Polaroids by Andy Warhol on September 20.

The exhibition features approximately 50 Polaroids and gelatin silver black-and-white prints on loan from the Turchin Center for the Arts at Appalachian State University and the Andy Warhol Photographic Legacy Program, a division of the Andy Warhol Foundation.

From 1970 to 1987, Warhol, armed with his Polaroid Big Shot camera, captured a wide range of individuals—the royalty, rock stars, executives, artists, patrons of the arts, and athletes who epitomized seventies and eighties high society, but also as many unknown subjects. These photographs include portraits of Caroline, Princess of Monaco; Diane von Furstenberg; Keith Herring, Steve Rubell as well as many portraits of unknown persons.

Famous for his contributions to Pop Art, Warhol used photography as a central part of his art-making process. Before turning to fine art, Warhol worked in advertising and commercial art, experiences that informed his approach to portraiture. In 1962, he debuted his first silkscreen paintings of celebrities, serializing pictures he pulled from magazines and press photos. In addition to using found images, Warhol eventually incorporated his own photography into his practice. In 1969 he launched inter/View magazine, which featured his photos of celebrities. By the 1970s and 1980s, portrait commissions were a major source of his income, and many of his Polaroids would serve as the basis for these works.

While each of the images in the exhibition is unique; the consistency of composition, poses, and plain white backdrop equalizes the famous and lesser-known subjects. To Warhol, they were all beautiful people. But even within this uniform staging, we see the artist finding numerous ways to create memorable, varied, and iconic compositions. Though these photos may be small in size, together the Warhol Polaroids provide a glimpse into the artistic process of one of the twentieth century’s most important artists.

This exhibition is supported by grants from the Regional Arts Commission and the Missouri Arts Council with additional assistance from the Center for the Humanities at UM-St. Louis.

 

Gallery 210 is on the University of Missouri – St. Louis at 44 East Drive, TCC between the North UM-St. Louis Metro Station and Touhill Performing Arts Center.  The gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday from 11AM to 5PM.  The gallery phone is (314) 516-5976; the fax is (314) 516-4997; and email is gallery@umsl.edu.  For parking locations, directions, and campus map, please visit gallery210.umsl.edu.

 

Handicapped parking is available near Galley 210.

 

Image Citation

Andy Warhol

Fire Island Party, 1982

Silver Gelatin Print

Gift of the the Andy Warhol Photographic Legacy Program, 2008

From the Permanent Collection of the Turchin Center for the Visual Arts

Exposure 17: Notions of the Grotesque is a group exhibition featuring artists who live and work in the St. Louis metropolitan area. The exposure series first started in the late 1990’s by the St. Louis Gallery Association and was held at Hunt Gallery on the Webster University campus. Gallery 210 gained ownership of the series in 2005 with Exposure 8. We are proud to continue the series with work by Travis Lawrence, Heather O’Shaughnessy,and Edo Rosenblith.
The grotesque is absurd, bizarre, and odd or unnatural in appearance and character. In decorative art, Grotesque involves the inclusion of unusual human and animal figures interwoven in other forms. Such ideology of the grotesque is a more than fitting characteristic that can be used to describe the work by O’Shaughnessy, Lawrence, and Rosenblith.
O’Shaughnessy is an outstanding self-taught artist who brings forth her beeswax sculptural pieces that are modeled after Italian anatomical sculptors. Reinventing the little known process of casting with beeswax, just as 17th century Italian anatomical sculptors had, she creates images inspired not only by the human anatomy, but resembles imagery reflected from her experience as a professional tattoo artist. Lawrence is a printmaker who obtained his Bachelor of Fine Arts in Printmaking at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville and works for Evil Prints in St. Louis. Gaining inspiration from 15th century illuminated manuscripts and Jungian psychology; he creates images of archetypal figures evoking deeper thought and individual interpretation. Rosenbilth is originally from Tel Aviv, Isreal and lived throughout the United States, including St. Louis, before setting in Rode Island where he obtained his Bachelors in Fine Art at Rhode Island School of Design. Rosenbilth is characteristically grotesque not for his admiration for previous art but for his fantastically distorted figures found throughout his drawings. His drawings reminisce early cartoon imagery and obscure caricature. Rosenbilth will also turn the gallery walls into a canvas of his own with a one of a kind wall painting that will remain in place throughout the duration of the exhibit.
Exposure 17 is scheduled to open August 23, 2014 and close October 11, 2014. A panel discussion and reception for the artists will be held September 6, 2014 between 4 and 7 that evening.