New Impressions from Hamilton

“New Impressions from Hamilton

October 2 to November 1, 2014

Gallery 210

University of Missouri-St. Louis

 

Located in Chicago the Hamilton Wood Type and Printing Museum is the only museum dedicated to the preservation, study, production and printing of wood type. With 1.5 million pieces of wood type and more than 1,000 styles and sizes of patterns, Hamilton’s collection is one of the premier wood type collections in the world. In addition to wood type, the Museum is home to an amazing array of advertising cuts from the 1930s through the 1970s, and all of the equipment necessary to make wood type and print with it, as well as equipment used in the production of hot metal type, tools of the craft and rare type specimen catalogs.

The Museum, at 45,000 square feet is one of the largest fully functional workshops in the world. Not only do the thousands of visitors who come through every year get to see how wood type was made at the factory, students, artists, typographers and designers visit to take workshops and actually put their hands on and use the collection to create works of art and scholarship in our pressroom at the Museum.

 

Campus. Handicapped parking is available behind Gallery 210.

 

Gallery 210 is on the University of Missouri- St. Louis at 44 East drive, TCC between the North UM-St. Louis Metro Station and Touhill Performing Arts Center. The gallery is open Tuesday to Saturday from 11:00 AM to 5:00 PM. The gallery phone is (314) 516-5976; the fax is (314) 516-4997; and email is gallery@umsl.edu. For parking locations, directions, and campus map please visit http://gallery210.umsl.edu

Evan Meaney                                                                                                         Ceibas: Epilogue: The Well of Representation.

September 23 to October 11, 2014

Evan Meaney is an American-born scientist who teaches time-based media design at the University of Tennessee. His practices explore liminalities and glitches of all kinds; equating failing data to ghosts, seances and archival hauntology. He has been an Iowa Arts Fellow, an artist in residence at the Experimental Television Center, and a founding member of GLI.TC/H. Currently, Evan works with the super computing team at Oak Ridge National Laboratories on new projects made possible through generous funding from the National Science Foundation.

His video, Ceibas: Epilogue: The Well of Representation, is in part a remake of Hollis Frampton’s 1979 film Gloria!. Frampton’s film is a silent-film re-enactments of “Finnegan’s Wake” that bookend her 1979 short Gloria! The ballad’s story plays out in broad, puppet-like gestures: dancing, weeping, fighting, limb-flailing. Meaney repurposed hacked, 16-bit video game technology; The Well of Representation asks us to reconsider our fear of the liminal.

Following the convergent narratives of several voices, ranging from the linearly historical to the cybernetically personal, we come to understand the journey ahead: searching from interface to interface, knowing that whatever home we find will be a collaborative compromise, one where we might live beyond our representations and finally come to say what we mean.

This exhibition is supported by grants from the Regional Arts Commission and the Missouri Arts Council with additional assistance from the Center for the Humanities at UM-St. Louis.

 

Gallery 210 is on the University of Missouri – St. Louis at 44 East Drive, TCC between the North UM-St. Louis Metro Station and Touhill Performing Arts Center.  The gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday from 11AM to 5PM.  The gallery phone is (314) 516-5976; the fax is (314) 516-4997; and email is gallery@umsl.edu.  For parking locations, directions, and campus map, please visit gallery210.umsl.edu.

 

Handicapped parking is available near Galley 210

Image Citation

Stiil from Evan Meaney                                                                                                         Ceibas: Epilogue: The Well of Representation 2011                                           00: 7:33”

Snapshots and Polaroids by Andy Warhol

September 20 to December 6, 2014

Gallery 210, University of Missouri St. Louis

Gallery 210 at the University of Missouri-St. Louis opens the exhibition present Snapshots and Polaroids by Andy Warhol on September 20.

The exhibition features approximately 50 Polaroids and gelatin silver black-and-white prints on loan from the Turchin Center for the Arts at Appalachian State University and the Andy Warhol Photographic Legacy Program, a division of the Andy Warhol Foundation.

From 1970 to 1987, Warhol, armed with his Polaroid Big Shot camera, captured a wide range of individuals—the royalty, rock stars, executives, artists, patrons of the arts, and athletes who epitomized seventies and eighties high society, but also as many unknown subjects. These photographs include portraits of Caroline, Princess of Monaco; Diane von Furstenberg; Keith Herring, Steve Rubell as well as many portraits of unknown persons.

Famous for his contributions to Pop Art, Warhol used photography as a central part of his art-making process. Before turning to fine art, Warhol worked in advertising and commercial art, experiences that informed his approach to portraiture. In 1962, he debuted his first silkscreen paintings of celebrities, serializing pictures he pulled from magazines and press photos. In addition to using found images, Warhol eventually incorporated his own photography into his practice. In 1969 he launched inter/View magazine, which featured his photos of celebrities. By the 1970s and 1980s, portrait commissions were a major source of his income, and many of his Polaroids would serve as the basis for these works.

While each of the images in the exhibition is unique; the consistency of composition, poses, and plain white backdrop equalizes the famous and lesser-known subjects. To Warhol, they were all beautiful people. But even within this uniform staging, we see the artist finding numerous ways to create memorable, varied, and iconic compositions. Though these photos may be small in size, together the Warhol Polaroids provide a glimpse into the artistic process of one of the twentieth century’s most important artists.

This exhibition is supported by grants from the Regional Arts Commission and the Missouri Arts Council with additional assistance from the Center for the Humanities at UM-St. Louis.

 

Gallery 210 is on the University of Missouri – St. Louis at 44 East Drive, TCC between the North UM-St. Louis Metro Station and Touhill Performing Arts Center.  The gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday from 11AM to 5PM.  The gallery phone is (314) 516-5976; the fax is (314) 516-4997; and email is gallery@umsl.edu.  For parking locations, directions, and campus map, please visit gallery210.umsl.edu.

 

Handicapped parking is available near Galley 210.

 

Image Citation

Andy Warhol

Fire Island Party, 1982

Silver Gelatin Print

Gift of the the Andy Warhol Photographic Legacy Program, 2008

From the Permanent Collection of the Turchin Center for the Visual Arts

Biennial: The UM-St. Louis Fine Art Faculty

October 25 to December 6, 2014

Gallery 210, University of Missouri-St. Louis

Gallery 210 is pleased to present “Biennial: The UM-St. Louis Fine Art Faculty”. This exhibitoin presents new work by tenured and adjuct studio faculty in the Art and Art History Department at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. The participating artist include Ken Anderson, McKnight, Lucí McMichael, Louis Lankford, Jean Miller, Anu Vedigiri, Mike Behle Jeffrey Sipplel and, Dan Younger. The exhibition features a wide variety of media including sculpture, graphic design, drawing, painting, photography, and mixed media.

 

The studio art faculty at UM-St. Louis exhibits their work regularly in local regional nationally and international venues. UMSL faculty have received grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Ford Foundation and been honored by a variety of national and international arts organizations. Their work is included in important public and private collections, including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Saint Louis Art Museum, the Library of Congress, Museum of Contemporary Photography, McDonnell Douglas Corporation and Emerson Electric.

The UMSL Art and Art History studio arts area offers the Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree in one of six concentrations: Drawing, Painting, Photography, Printmaking, Graphic Design and General Fine Arts. The department also offers a Minor in Studio Art and a Certificate in Photographic Studies. Classes are taught at the Fine Arts Building. UM-St. Louis has a transfer agreement with the St. Louis Community College District, which offers a direct transfer to upper division BFA courses to students who graduate with an AFA degree from one of the three SLCC schools.

There is a public reception for the artist at Gallery 210 on October 25 starting at 5:00 PM and continuing through December 6.

All Gallery 210 events are free and open to the public. Public parking for Gallery 210 is available at the South Millennium Parking Garage on the east side of East Drive on the UM-St. Louis Campus. Handicapped parking is available behind Gallery 210.

Gallery 210 is on the University of Missouri-St. Louis at 44 East Drive, TCC between the North UM-St. Louis Metro Station and the Touhill Performing Arts Center. The gallery is open Tuesday to Saturday from 11:00 AM to 5:00 PM. The gallery phone is (314) 516-5976; the fax is (314) 516-4997; and email is suhret@umsl.edu. For parking locations, campus maps and directions to Gallery 210 please visit our website at umsl.edu/~gallery/.